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Definitions of the Terms in the Electrical Characteristics Table

Electrical Characteristics (Ta = 25°C)

Characteristic Symbol Test Conditions Min Typ Max Unit
Forward voltage VF(1) IF = 1 mA 0.61 V
VF(2) IF = 10 mA 0.74
VF(3) IF = 100 mA 0.92 1.20
Reverse current IR(1) VR = 30 V 0.1 µA
IR(2) VR = 80 V 0.5
Total capacitance CT VR = 0, f = 1 MHz 2.2 4.0 pF
Reverse recovery time trr IF = 10 mA 1.6 4.0 ns
Definitions of the Terms in the Electrical Characteristics Table

Forward current, IF, is calculated as shown below:

IF = IS (exp (qVF/KT) − 1)
IS: Reverse saturation current
T: Absolute temperature
VF: Forward voltage
K: Boltzmann constant
q: Electron charge
The above equation applies only to the small-current region.

The current that flows through a diode when it is reverse-biased is called reverse current (IR) or saturation current (IS).
Generally, silicon diodes exhibit a reverse current, IR, of a few nanoamperes (10−9 A) in the saturated region. IR nearly doubles over a temperature change of 8 to 10°C.

Definitions of the Terms in the Electrical Characteristics Table

Let total capacitance be CT. CT is primarily due to the depletion layer that is formed when a p-n diode is reverse-biased. The width of the depletion layer increases with reverse voltage, VR. The following figure shows a CT−vs−VR curve. Total capacitance decreases as reverse voltage increases. Generally, total capacitance and the CT−VR slope are greatly affected by the junction area and the dopant concentration.

Definitions of the Terms in the Electrical Characteristics Table

Following forward conduction, a diode does not attain its blocking capability even if it is reverse-biased. Large reverse current, IR, flows until all minority carriers in the p-n junction, which create a low-impedance path in the reverse direction, are depleted. The time required for a p-n junction to recover up to the 10% point of IR when the bias voltage is suddenly switched from forward to reverse, is referred to as reverse recovery time, trr. It represents the switching speed of a diode. A test circuit example is shown below.

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